Man freedives to 100m without fins

Barefoot descent in the Bahamas sets a new world record

Author: Pat
31st January 2012
 

A New Zealander has dived down to 100m on a single breath, swimming barefoot and without fins.

Sponsored by dive instrument maker Suunto, William Trubridge descended to the new record depth at Dean’s Blue Hole on Long Island, The Bahamas.

The 100-metre depth (also known as a hectometer, fact fans) was first reached in 1980 by Jacques Mayol, famous for his portrayal in the movie “The Big Blue.”

However Mayol used a weighted sled to descend and an inflated lift bag to return to the surface.

Trubridge wore no weight for his attempt but just a wetsuit, and swam underwater breaststroke next to a descent line, which he could use as a guide only.

At 100 meters below the surface he collected a tag as proof of depth, which was also validated by the Suunto D4 computer on his wrist.

The plucky Kiwi then swam back to the surface and into the record books.

 
 
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