What happened to the Darlwyne?

New book uncovers a tragic sinking – and rediscovery

Author: Pat
24th October 2019
 

In July 1966 a midsized pleasure craft sank without trace in bad weather on a return trip along the Cornish coast to Falmouth.

It was the day after England won the World Cup – which may explain why the sinking of the ‘Darlwyne’ and the 31 people lost didn’t enter the public consciousness.

a terrible tragedy and a mystery

Eight of those drowned were children, and in total only twelve bodies were ever found, washed up on local beaches around Dodman Point. It was a terrible tragedy and a mystery, with no wreckage ever discovered, despite extensive searches.

A new book by Nick Lyon called ‘The Forgotten Shipwreck’ will publish shortly, shedding some long overdue light on the story of the Darlwyne.

Alex Gibson of Dived Up Publications said: “It spans so many facets, from a village numbed, with whole families wiped out, to angry exchanges in the House of Commons and law courts. There is intrigue, chicanery, deceit, incompetence and greed. It had far-reaching ramifications and yet, for all that, the Darlwyne tragedy lacked an ending.”

Fifty years after the sinking, Nick’s book recounts how a team of divers, archaeologists, filmmakers, photographers and wreck researchers set about to change that.

The Forgotten Shipwreck will be published on 29th October by Dived Up Publications, priced £19.95 RRP.

 
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